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NEW RELEASE:
GHK Enhances
Mesenchymal Stem Cells
Osteogenesis
Acta Biomaterialia (2019)
Self-Assembled
Antibacterial GHK-Cu
Nanoparticles for
Wound Healing
Particle & Particle (2019)
Effect of GHK-Cu
on Stem Cells and
Relevant Genes
OBM Geriatrics
(2018)
GHK Alleviates
Neuronal Apoptosis Due
to Brain Hemorrhage
Frontiers in Neuroscience
(2018)
GHK-Cu:
Endogenous Antioxidant
International Journal of Pathophysiology and Pharmacology (2018)
Regenerative and
Protective Actions of
GHK-Cu Peptide
International Journal of
Molecular Sciences
(2018)
Skin Regenerative and
Anti-Cancer Actions
of Copper Peptides
Cosmetics
(2018)
GHK-Cu Accelerates
Scald Wound Healing
Promoting Angiogenesis
Wound Repair and
Regeneration
(2017)

GHK Peptide Inhibits
Pulmonary Fibrosis
by Suppressing TGF-β1
Frontiers in Pharmacology
(2017)
UNITED STATES PATENT:
Non-Toxic
Skin Cancer Therapy
with Copper Peptides
(2017)
The Effect of Human
Peptide GHK Relevant to
Nervous System Function
and Cognitive Decline
Brain Sciences (2017)
Effects of Tripeptide
GHK in Pain-Induced
Aggressive Behavior
Bulletin of Experimental
Biology & Medicine
(2017)
GHK-Cu Elicits
In Vitro Alterations
in Extracellular Matrix
Am Journal of Respiratory
and Critical Care Medicine

(2017)
Selected Biomarkers &
Copper Compounds
Scientific Reports

(2016)
GHK-Cu on Collagen,
Elastin, and Facial Wrinkles
Journal of Aging Science
(2016)
Tri-Peptide GHK-Cu
and Acute Lung Injury
Oncotarget
(2016)

Effect of GHK Peptide
on Pain Sensitivity
Experimental
Pharmacology
(2015)

New Data of the
Cosmeceutical
and TriPeptide GHK
SOFW Journal
(2015)
GHK Peptide as a
Natural Modulator of
Multiple Cellular Pathways
in Skin Regeneration
BioMed Research (2015)
Resetting Skin Genome
Back to Health
Naturally with GHK
Textbook of Aging Skin
(2015)
GHK-Cu May Prevent
Oxidative Stress in Skin
by Regulating Copper and
Modifying Expression of
Numerous Antioxidant Genes Cosmetics (2015)
GHK Increases
TGF-β1 in
Human Fibroblasts

Acta Poloniae
Pharmaceutica

(2014)
GHK:
The Human Skin Remodeling Peptide Induces Anti-Cancer
Expression and DNA Repair Analytical Oncology
(2014)
GHK & DNA:
Resetting the
Human Genome to Health
BioMed Research
International
(2014)
Enhanced Tropic Factor Secretion of Mesenchymal
Stem Cells with GHK
Acta Biomater
(2014)
Anxiolytic (Anti-Anxiety)
Effects of GHK Peptide
Bulletin of Experimental
Biology & Medicine
(2014)
Emphysema-Related
Lung Destruction and
its Reversal by GHK
Genome Medicine
(2012)
TriPeptide GHK Induces
Programmed Cell Death
of Neuroblastoma
Journal of Biotechnology
(2012)
Stem Cell
Recovering Effect
of GHK in Skin
Peptide Science
(2012)
Skin Penetration of
Copper Tripeptide in Vitro
Journal of International
Inflammation Research
(2010)
Possible Therapeutics
for Colorectal Cancer
Journal of Clinical and
Experimental Metastasis
(2010)
UNITED STATES PATENT:
Methods of Controlling
Differentiation and
Proliferation of Stem Cells
(2005)
Effects of
Copper Tripeptide
on Irradiated Fibroblasts
American Medical Association
(2005)
--- CLICK TO VIEW ALL ---
Avoid Buying Fake Copper Peptides Dangerous







Chemical Sunscreens Have Three Primary Defects:Two women sunbathing

1. They are powerful free radical generators.

Their free radical generation increases cellular damage and changes that lead to cancer.

2. They often have strong estrogenic activity.

Estrogenic - "Gender Bending" - chemicals interfere with normal sexual development and engendering a host of secondary medical problems.

3. They are synthetic chemicals that are alien to the human body and accumulate in body fat stores.

The human body is well adapted to de-toxify biologicals that it has been exposed to over tens of millions of years. But it has often has difficulty removing new and non-biological compounds such DDT, Dioxin, PCBs, and chemical sunscreens.v

Chemical Sunscreens Include:woman with parasol

Benzophenones (dixoybenzone, oxybenzone);

PABA and PABA esters (ethyl dihydroxy propyl PAB, glyceryl PABA, p-aminobenzoic acid, padimate-O or octyl dimethyl PABA);

Cinnamates (cinoxate, ethylhexyl p-methoxycinnamate, octocrylene, octyl methoxycinnamate);

Salicylates (ethylhexyl salicylate, homosalate, octyl salicylate);

Digalloyl trioleate;

Menthyl anthranilate;

Avobenzone[butyl-methyoxydibenzoylmethane; Parsol 1789] - This is the only chemical sunscreen currently allowed by the European Community. However, its safety is still questionable since it easily penetrates the skin and is a strong free radical generator.

Sunscreen Chemicals May Generate Free Radicals Within Your Bodywoman wearing black with parasol protecting herself from the sun

Most chemical sunscreens contain, as UVA and UVB blockers, from 2 to 5% of compounds such avobenzone, benzophenone, ethylhexyl p-methoxycinnimate, 2-ethylhexyl salicylate, homosalate, octyl methoxycinnamate, oxybenzone (benzophenone-3) as the active ingredients.

Benzophenone (and similar compounds) is one of the most powerful free radical generators known. It is used in industrial processes as a free radical generator to initiate chemical reactions.

Benzophenone is activated by ultraviolet light energy that breaks benzophenone's double bond to produce two free radical sites.

The free radicals then react with other molecules and produce damage to the fats, proteins, and DNA of the cells - the types of damage that produce skin aging and the development of cancer.

Adding to the problem is that large amounts of applied sunscreens can enter the bloodstream though your skin. In the 1970s, Prof. Howard Maibach warned that up to 35 percent of sunscreen applied to the skin can pass through the skin and enter the bloodstream but this had little effect on sunscreen promotion or safety testing.

The longer sunscreen chemicals are left on the skin, the greater the absorption into the body. This may be a factor in the large increases in cancer (breast, uterine, colon, prostate) observed in regions, such as Northern Australia, where the use of sunscreen chemicals has been heavily promoted by medical groups and the local governments.

Many sunscreens also contain triethanolamine, a compound that can cause the formation of cancer causing nitrosamines in products by combining with nitrite used as preservative and often not disclosed on sunscreen labels.

In March 1998, Dr. John Knowland of the University of Oxford reported studies showing that certain sunscreens containing PABA and its derivatives can damage DNA, at least in the test tube experiments.

When a chemical sunscreen, Padimate-O, was added to DNA and the mixture exposed to the ultraviolet rays of sunlight, it was found that the sunscreen broke down in sunlight, releasing highly active agents that could damage DNA. It did not block out the UV, but instead absorbed energy.

"It became excited and set off a chemical reaction that resulted in the generation of the dangerous free radicals and broken DNA strands that can lead to cancer," he said and further commented that while it's too early to make blanket recommendations, "I would not use a product containing PABA, Padimate-O or other PABA derivatives."

Dr. Martin Rieger reported that PABA may play a role in DNA-dimer formation, a type of DNA damage that can induce carcinogenic changes.

Avobenzone (Parsol 1789) May Not Be Safe Either

In 1997, Europe, Canada, and Australia changed sunscreens to use three specific active sunscreen ingredients - avobenzone (also known as Parsol 1789), titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide - as the basis of sunscreens.

In the USA, the cosmetic companies have held off this policy as they try to sell off their stockpiles of cosmetics containing toxic sunscreens banned in other countries.

However, avobenzone is a powerful free radical generator and also should have been banned. Avobenzone is easily absorbed through the epidermis and is still a chemical that absorbs ultraviolet radiation energy.

Since it cannot destroy this energy, it has to convert the light energy into chemical energy, which is normally released as free radicals.

While it blocks long-wave UVA, it does not effectively UVB or short-wave UVA radiation, and is usually combined with other sunscreen chemicals to produce a "broad-spectrum" product. In sunlight, avobenzone degrades and becomes ineffective within about 1 hour.

Questions or Advice?

Email Dr. Loren Pickart at drlorenpickart@gmail.com

Call us at 1-800-405-1912 Monday Through Friday (8 am to 6 pm) PST